Treasurer’s Top 10: Sumner County

This week, we highlight Sumner County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?Sumner County Courthouse

  • Sandra S. Dill
  • Stephen P. Durst
  • Diversified Services Inc
  • Max Hapner
  • Everett Gardner
  • Arnetta Carter
  • Sheri Baker
  • Nicole S. Burton
  • Ellen Graber
  • Megan Foltz

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

State Treasurer Announces $1000 Learning Quest Giveaway at State Fair

Kansas State FairTOPEKA, Kan. — State Treasurer Ron Estes announced today the opportunity for Kansas State Fair visitors to enter into a $1000 Learning Quest 529 account giveaway.

Attendees can enter the drawing by visiting the Learning Quest site near gate five, where a school bus themed Volkswagen van will be parked Sept. 5 – 9.

“The fair is one of our state’s greatest traditions,” said Kansas State Treasurer Ron Estes. “We’re proud to be a sponsor of this year’s festivities and look forward to raising awareness among families about the importance of saving for higher education.”

Learning Quest ambassadors will be available at the site to discuss college savings with parents and answer any questions regarding the Kansas Education Savings Program.

mobile vanChildren will also have the opportunity to dress up as their desired career at a photo booth equipped with a variety of occupational accessories. As mementos of their children’s career ambitions, keepsake photos will be given to parents.

The Learning Quest 529 Education Savings Program was created to help families invest for their child’s career education after high school, whether at a traditional four-year university, community college, technical college or vocational school. Accounts can be opened with as little as $25.

To learn more about saving for a higher education, visit www.LearningQuest.com or call 1-800-579-2203. For details about future events and giveaways visit the Learning Quest Facebook page at www.facebook.com/KSLearningQuest529.

Ron Estes is the 39th state treasurer for the state of Kansas and is the first state-wide elected official from the city of Wichita in 20 years. He was elected to serve as the Midwest Regional Vice President for the National Association of State Treasurers 2012-2013, and now serves on the College Savings Plans Network Executive Board. Ron has also served as treasurer for both Sedgwick County and the Kansas County Treasurers’ Association. He was born in Topeka and is a fifth-generation Kansan. His family continues to run a farm in Osage County. Ron and his wife, Susan, have three children.

 

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State Treasurer Estes Brings Unclaimed Property to State Fair

Kansas State FairTOPEKA, Kan. — State Treasurer Ron Estes is urging this year’s 2014 Kansas State Fair attendees to visit his unclaimed property booth to check if a portion of $295 million in missing money belongs to them.

The State Treasurer’s Office booth will be fully equipped with a computerized database and staff ready to help Kansans search for and claim unclaimed property Sept. 5 – 14.

“We had great success during last year’s State Fair, returning more than $425,000 to respective owners; and we hope to have even better results this year,” said Kansas State Treasurer Ron Estes. “I encourage everyone to stop by and check for their name and the names of family and friends.”

Fair BoothUnclaimed property comes from forgotten bank accounts, stocks, bonds, insurance premium overpayments, refunds, abandoned safe deposit boxes and other property. It is the treasurer’s goal to locate the rightful owners and heirs of unclaimed assets currently being held by the State of Kansas.

People who are unable to attend the fair can search for unclaimed property online at www.kansascash.com or by calling 1-800-432-0386.

Ron Estes is the 39th state treasurer for the state of Kansas and is the first state-wide elected official from the city of Wichita in 20 years. He was elected to serve as the Midwest Regional Vice President for the National Association of State Treasurers 2012-2013, and now serves on the College Savings Plans Network Executive Board. Ron has also served as treasurer for both Sedgwick County and the Kansas County Treasurers’ Association. He was born in Topeka and is a fifth-generation Kansan. His family continues to run a farm in Osage County. Ron and his wife, Susan, have three children.

Treasurer’s Top 10: Jewell County

This week, we highlight Jewell County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?Jewell County Courthouse

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Kenneth & Aletha Knight
  2. David Hazelwood
  3. James A. Love
  4. Randolph & Donna Moody
  5. Douglas Hancock
  6. Jeff Koster
  7. Danny L. Simmelink
  8. Dorothy L. Voboril
  9. Judeen Henriksen
  10. Clifford M. Thibault

Money Matters: How to Dispute a Credit Card Charge

By Jason Alderman  PracticalMoneySkills.com

Have you ever ordered something online that was delivered damaged ‘ or never arrived at all? Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on your credit card statement you didn’t make? Most of us have.Credit Card

Fortunately, the 1975 Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects your rights during such credit card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting charges made to your account. Here’s how it works:

First, FCBA protection applies only to “open-end” credit account transactions ‘ those involving credit cards or revolving charges (e.g., department store accounts). It doesn’t cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans.

Billing errors that are covered by the FCBA include:

  • Fraudulent or unauthorized use of your credit card, whether it was stolen or merchants charged unapproved items to your account.
  • Charges that list the wrong date or amount.
  • Charges for goods or services you either did not accept or that weren’t delivered as agreed.
  • Math errors, such as being charged twice for a transaction.
  • Failure to post payments or other credits.

(Note: Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, you’re only liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.)

Review all billing statements carefully upon receipt because in order to be covered under FCBA rules, most disputed transactions must be reported within 60 days of the statement date on which the error appeared.

First, contact the merchant and try to resolve the dispute directly with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesn’t work, you can escalate the process by filing a written report with your credit card issuer within the 60-day window.

The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing, within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles ‘ but not more than 90 days.

Send your letter via certified mail to the card issuer’s billing inquiry address, not the payment address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error. Include copies of sales slips or other documents that support your position.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you may withhold payment of the disputed amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact, many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the matter is resolved since they are representing you, their client, in the dispute.

If it turns out your bill contains a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections that will be made. In addition to crediting your account, they must remove all finance charges, late fees, or other charges related to the error.

However, if the card issuer’s investigation determines that you owe part ‘ or all ‘ of the disputed amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the investigation’s results, you may further dispute your claim with the creditor, as outlined by the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0219-fair-credit-billing. (That site also contains a sample dispute letter and other helpful FCBA information.)

If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a complaint with the FTC or sue them in court.

Hopefully, you’ll never have a billing dispute that goes to these extremes. But it’s good to know how consumer laws protect you, just in case.

 

 

Treasurer’s Top 10: Greeley County

This week, we highlight Greeley County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?

Greeley County

Greeley County

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Grubb & Sons Harvesting
  2. Marvin Watson
  3. Jose P. Hernandez
  4. Kendra Young
  5. Zula E. Chapman
  6. Curtis E. Simpson
  7. Claud Branum
  8. Gladys Miller
  9. Ilene Ochsner
  10. Delbert Callen

Treasurer’s Top 10: Thomas County

This week, we highlight Thomas County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Mason Wolf
  2. Larry L. Roehl
  3. James R. Mazanec
  4. Kathy Baird
  5. Madeline M. & Joseph S. Moos
  6. Denis Weiland
  7. Mildred Yarnell
  8. Cody Wilson
  9. Larry Donley
  10. Carl J. Anderson