Treasurer’s Top 10: Jewell County

This week, we highlight Jewell County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?Jewell County Courthouse

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Kenneth & Aletha Knight
  2. David Hazelwood
  3. James A. Love
  4. Randolph & Donna Moody
  5. Douglas Hancock
  6. Jeff Koster
  7. Danny L. Simmelink
  8. Dorothy L. Voboril
  9. Judeen Henriksen
  10. Clifford M. Thibault

Money Matters: How to Dispute a Credit Card Charge

By Jason Alderman  PracticalMoneySkills.com

Have you ever ordered something online that was delivered damaged ‘ or never arrived at all? Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on your credit card statement you didn’t make? Most of us have.Credit Card

Fortunately, the 1975 Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects your rights during such credit card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting charges made to your account. Here’s how it works:

First, FCBA protection applies only to “open-end” credit account transactions ‘ those involving credit cards or revolving charges (e.g., department store accounts). It doesn’t cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans.

Billing errors that are covered by the FCBA include:

  • Fraudulent or unauthorized use of your credit card, whether it was stolen or merchants charged unapproved items to your account.
  • Charges that list the wrong date or amount.
  • Charges for goods or services you either did not accept or that weren’t delivered as agreed.
  • Math errors, such as being charged twice for a transaction.
  • Failure to post payments or other credits.

(Note: Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, you’re only liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.)

Review all billing statements carefully upon receipt because in order to be covered under FCBA rules, most disputed transactions must be reported within 60 days of the statement date on which the error appeared.

First, contact the merchant and try to resolve the dispute directly with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesn’t work, you can escalate the process by filing a written report with your credit card issuer within the 60-day window.

The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing, within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles ‘ but not more than 90 days.

Send your letter via certified mail to the card issuer’s billing inquiry address, not the payment address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error. Include copies of sales slips or other documents that support your position.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you may withhold payment of the disputed amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact, many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the matter is resolved since they are representing you, their client, in the dispute.

If it turns out your bill contains a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections that will be made. In addition to crediting your account, they must remove all finance charges, late fees, or other charges related to the error.

However, if the card issuer’s investigation determines that you owe part ‘ or all ‘ of the disputed amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the investigation’s results, you may further dispute your claim with the creditor, as outlined by the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0219-fair-credit-billing. (That site also contains a sample dispute letter and other helpful FCBA information.)

If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a complaint with the FTC or sue them in court.

Hopefully, you’ll never have a billing dispute that goes to these extremes. But it’s good to know how consumer laws protect you, just in case.

 

 

Treasurer’s Top 10: Greeley County

This week, we highlight Greeley County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?

Greeley County

Greeley County

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Grubb & Sons Harvesting
  2. Marvin Watson
  3. Jose P. Hernandez
  4. Kendra Young
  5. Zula E. Chapman
  6. Curtis E. Simpson
  7. Claud Branum
  8. Gladys Miller
  9. Ilene Ochsner
  10. Delbert Callen

Treasurer’s Top 10: Thomas County

This week, we highlight Thomas County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Mason Wolf
  2. Larry L. Roehl
  3. James R. Mazanec
  4. Kathy Baird
  5. Madeline M. & Joseph S. Moos
  6. Denis Weiland
  7. Mildred Yarnell
  8. Cody Wilson
  9. Larry Donley
  10. Carl J. Anderson

Treasurer’s Top 10: Logan County

This week, we highlight Logan County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you see anyone on this list you know?

Logan County Courthouse

Logan County Courthouse

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Vickie Rebarcheck
  2. Edwin V. Burris
  3. WW Crownover
  4. Betty Lee
  5. Edna & Arnold Blankenburg
  6. David L. Gallagher
  7. Lucille C. & Richard D. Perry
  8. Lela M. Farmer
  9. John A. Smith
  10. Lids Guillaume

Money Matters: Don’t Let Back-to-School Tasks Sneak up on You

By Jason Alderman  PracticalMoneySkills.com

Parents, if this is your first time at the back-to-school rodeo, let me share a few lessons my wife and I have learned the hard way. Chances are you’ll be spending the next few weeks filling out piles of pre-enrollment paperwork, lining up carpools and, of course, taking the dreaded shopping excursions for clothes and school supplies.

Back to School CostsIf you’re a first-timer or simply need a back-to-school refresher course, here are a few suggestions that can help you save time, money and sanity:

Get organized. Maintain a correspondence file from your kid’s school for things like registration requirements, report cards, permission slips, required vaccinations, school policies, teacher and parent contact information, etc. Ask whether the school has a website, online calendar or email list you can join. Also, create a family master calendar.

Back-to-school shopping. Between new clothes, classroom supplies and extracurricular activity fees and equipment, many parents end up spending hundreds of dollars per child. Ideally, you’ve been setting money aside all year. If not, you’ll need to determine what you can afford to spend without blowing your overall budget.

Here are a few organizational and money-saving tips:

  • Before you shop, make a comprehensive list for each child. Use previous years’ expenses as a guide and compare notes with other parents and school officials.
  • Engage your kids in the budgeting process. Share how much money is available to spend and get them involved in prioritizing expenses between “needs” and “wants.”
  • Go through your kids’ closets and have them try on everything. Make an inventory of items that fit and are in good shape, and take it when shopping so you don’t accidentally buy duplicates. (While you’re at it, share, sell or donate unneeded items.)
  • Spread clothing purchases throughout the year so your kids don’t outgrow everything at once. Many stores hold fall clearance sales to make room for holiday merchandise.
  • Review the school’s dress code so you don’t waste money on inappropriate clothing.
  • Although shopping online can save money, time and gas, don’t forget to factor in shipping and return costs, which could undo any net savings. If your kids are old enough, put them in charge of online comparison shopping and coupon clipping.
  • Ask which school supplies you’re expected to buy. Go in with other families to take advantage of volume discounts and sales.
  • Find out how much extracurricular activities (athletics, music, art, etc.) cost. Account for uniforms, membership dues, private lessons, field trips, snacks, etc.
  • Rent or buy used sporting equipment or musical instruments until you’re sure they’ll stick with an activity.
  • Know when to spend more for higher quality. Cheaper notebook paper shouldn’t matter, but don’t buy poorly made shoes that might hamper proper physical development.
  • Before buying new clothing or accessories, look for “gently used” items in the closets of your older kids and friends, at garage sales, thrift and consignment stores and online.
  • Clip newspaper and online coupons. Many stores will match competitors’ prices even if their own items aren’t on sale. Plus, many consolidation websites post downloadable coupons and sale codes for online retailers, including: CouponCabin.com, CouponCode.com, CouponCraze.com, DealHunting.com and Dealnews.com.
  • Mobile shopping apps let in-store smartphone and mobile browser users scan product barcodes and make on-the-spot price comparisons, read reviews, download coupons, buy products and more.
  • Follow your favorite retailers on Facebook and Twitter, where many post special savings for their followers.

Bottom line: If you get organized before setting out on back-to-school shopping, you can save money, time and aggravation.

 

Treasurer’s Top 10: Morton County

This week, we highlight Morton County! Here’s a look at the Top 10 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you know anyone below?

Morton County, Point of Rocks

Point of Rocks–Cimarron National Grasslands of Morton county in southwestern Kansas.

If so, have them check out www.kansascash.com  and search their name to make a claim. They can also call 800-432-0386 (toll-free) or 785-296-4165.

  1. Rebecca Payne
  2. Clint Thomason
  3. Carl G. Payne
  4. Helen L. Swagerty
  5. Ray White
  6. Robert F. Hornberger
  7. Rick D. Claassen
  8. Melvin Forbes
  9. David Kyle Scott
  10. Mae Harlan